Planning for All Ages and Abilities Through Inclusive and Virtual Walk Audits

Walk audits are a common public engagement activity used in pedestrian planning, but often are not accessible to or inclusive of people with disabilities. People with disabilities are more likely to rely on walking for daily trips and may be more aware of and impacted by problems in the transportation network. Planning and street design processes benefit from incorporating the expertise of people with disabilities; when a street is accessible for people with disabilities, it is accessible for all people. The Inclusive Walk Audit Facilitator’s Guide, developed by the Minnesota Department of Health and Alta Planning + Design, provides specific guidance and information on how to better include people with disabilities and to highlight disability in walk audits so that planning processes are more inclusive. More information.

ActiveTO: The City of Toronto’s COVID-19 Response – 26 Kilometers of Rapid Installed Bikeways

The City of Toronto’s COVID-19 response programs, including ActiveTO, have been focused on making sure people have space to get around while respecting physical distancing. Each response program was developed through a review process using the City’s Equity Lens Tool and demonstrating a strong commitment to reducing inequities experienced by Toronto’s vulnerable populations. More information.

Virtual City Cycling – Essential Trip

Whether you are riding our city streets out of necessity to get to work, to the pharmacy, to the grocery store, or to an appointment or you are wanting to just get out and move your body, the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition is here for you.

In this lesson, you will:

  • know where to get a bike or your bike repaired
  • learn how to do an ABC-Q check to make sure you’re bike is ready to go
  • fit your helmet
  • plan your essential trip route
  • learn signaling and other timely communication strategies
  • know how to safely take the lane
  • share your strategies for safely getting to, being at, and getting home from your destination

We are committed to your safety as you negotiate the city streets for transportation, essential services, and recreation.  We’ll remind you of the CDC’s Social Distancing and Prevention Guidelines that apply to people on bikes in each class.

Registration and more information.

Making Intersection and Crossings Safe and Efficient: A Summary of the NCHRP 3-133 Report

The development of safety of metrics within signalized intersections is an important effort for cities. Safer pedestrians and bicycle crossings can be created by eliminating or mitigating conflicts with turning traffic, but what the research suggests is that in order to achieve Vision Zero, we need to identify new requirements for protected turns. This webinar will include an assessment of left and right turns and the use of leading pedestrian intervals (LPIs) with some assessment of whether bicycle traffic can use LPIs. In addition to the signal timing, some consideration of geometric treatments such as protected intersection layouts and other features are critical to this conversation. More information.

Virtual City Cycling – Essential Trip

Whether you are riding our city streets out of necessity to get to work, to the pharmacy, to the grocery store, or to an appointment or you are wanting to just get out and move your body, the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition is here for you.

In this lesson, you will:

  • know where to get a bike or your bike repaired
  • learn how to do an ABC-Q check to make sure you’re bike is ready to go
  • fit your helmet
  • plan your essential trip route
  • learn signaling and other timely communication strategies
  • know how to safely take the lane
  • share your strategies for safely getting to, being at, and getting home from your destination

We are committed to your safety as you negotiate the city streets for transportation, essential services, and recreation.  We’ll remind you of the CDC’s Social Distancing and Prevention Guidelines that apply to people on bikes in each class.

Registration and more information.

Webinar: What Can a Body Do? How We Meet the Built World – a conversation with author Sara Hendren

Join America Walks for a conversation with Sara Hendren about her book What Can a Body Do? How We Meet the Built World. Walking or wheeling, accompanied or alone, getting around in public space means getting into the public sphere–and for people with disabilities, the very fabric of streets and sidewalks and architecture has had to be remade, edited and altered, to make moving around possible for all of us. Sharing the city and sharing civic life isn’t easy or obvious, but the design of those spaces can help us build the collective futures we want. Sara Hendren, design researcher at Olin College, will share stories and examples of the generative, surprising, and universally human ways we can think anew about the design of our homes, workplaces, city streets and more. Registration and more information.

Webinar: Land Use and Transportation Policies for a Sustainable Future

Even though there are tremendous uncertainties in the timing and evolution path of the Autonomous Vehicles (AV) technology, it may become a likely reality within most MPOs’ long-range regional transportation plan horizon of twenty years. Yet a recent survey of the largest MPOs in the US indicates only one of them “even mentions driverless, automated, or autonomous vehicles in its most recent RTP”. One of the uncertainties in assessing the impacts of AV is their direction: on one hand, self-driving cars could increase VMT by increasing roadway capacity, lowering costs of travel; on the other, they may reduce VMT by enabling more car-sharing, improving access to transit, eliminating the fixed costs of car ownership, and reclaiming parking space. To date, there is no suitable conceptual framework or modeling tools available to MPOs for quantitatively assessing the likely long-term effects of AV or potential policy scenarios. What are the possible impacts on travel and land use of the emerging AV technology? How can we advance this innovative mobility option by making sure it builds sustainable and equitable communities in its adoption? By examining the likely social, economic, and environmental outcomes of integrating AV in our cities and by starting to consider policies and plans to preempt their potential adverse impacts, we can ensure that the AV technology improves access for all people. More information and registration.